Red Lion textile mill helping re-create Star-Spangled banner

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As the 200th birthday of the Star-Spangled banner approaches, Family Heirloom Weavers just outside of Red Lion, York County, is taking part in a unique tribute to the iconic flag.

For the past 30 years, Family Heirloom Weavers has been David Kline’s life’s work.

Every piece that leave his mill is crafted with meticulous care, and that attention to detail is what brought the Maryland Historical Society knocking.

The group is commissioning Kline’s business to weave the fabric for an exact replica of the Star-Spangled banner.

Kline’s grandson Matt Barley said it was important for them and the historical society for the flag to be as authentic as possible.

“It’s still going to be material that would’ve been used in the wool, yarn that would’ve been used during that time period, still the same weave structure,” Barley said.

This flag, just like the original, will be massive, 30 feet by 42 feet. To put that in perspective, 30 feet is about the height of a two-story house.

“By having employees that can still do these things and still keep these things running, and still recreate this art, I think it’s invaluable,” Barley said.

Using Family Heirloom’s fabric, more than 100 volunteers will stitch the flag together.

The completed flag will fly over Baltimore’s Fort McHenry during a Defenders Day celebration in September, just like the original did 200 years ago.

David Kline and his family will have front row seats.

“It’ll be a good day,” Kline said.

After flying at Fort McHenry, the flag will go on a year-long national tour. It’ll fly at the 9-11 memorial in New York, before finding a home at the Smithsonian American History Museum, where the original Star-Spangled banner is on display.

To find out more about the project, visit the Maryland Historical Society’s website here.