Family coping with news of dentist’s alleged unsanitary practices

“The last 16 days we have been doing everything we can to comply with what the state wants us to do. And seeking out immediate testing for myself and my son Lucas,” said Perry Capurro. Capurro and his 7-year old son had to get tested for Hepatitis c, Hepatitis B, and HIV after receiving a notice from the State Department of Health.

Their tests came back negative, but the Capurro’s aren’t in the clear yet. They have to be re-tested again in six months.

The department of health found that Dr. Jacqueline A. Marcin, a dentist in York County, wasn’t sanitizing her tools before re-using them. “Being older there’s an almost automatic trust relationship with a physician or a doctor or a care provider. That not only are these people licensed and insured and educated but that they are going to do the right thing,” said Perry Capurro.

Perry and his son Lucas have had difficulty coping with the news. He says Lucas has had nightmares, and doesn’t want to go to a dentist. “His reaction was shock, kind of disbelief, he didn’t really understand what was going on. I would say a little afraid, fearful, a lot of questions. He had built a really great relationship [with her] over the last two years,” said Perry Capurro. “He still has a lot of questions and still has a lot of concerns. he’s still not sure about a lot of things.”

Perry says he hasn’t received a lot of support from anyone handling the matter. He is also waiting to hear if Dr. Marcin will be reimbursing him for the testing.

Health officials say no patients have tested positive for any illnesses.

Dr. Marcin’s license has been suspended.

The Pennsylvania Board of Dentistry voted to accept an agreement with the York County dentist that could allow her to practice dentistry again.

Under the agreement accepted, Marcin’s license remains suspended. Her office in Springettsbury Townhip is closed.

She can complete a series of requirements and then ask to resume practicing on a probationary basis for five years. Those requirements include: a 20-hour course on infection control; completing recommendations of an infection control consultant who’s already visited her office; additional hours of continuing education; cooperate with Department of State investigations; agree to random office inspections; agree to be overseen by a practice monitor who’s unaffiliated with her office.