Keeping the structure of your home safe in the snow

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YORK, Pa. -- The snowstorm has passed and experts said although the snow will probably not cause many problems with homes - the melting and re-freezing of the snow can be an issue.

Josh Carney, president of Carney Engineering Group,  said, "Things like ice packs coming off of roofs, things like gutters and down spouts getting ripped you know those can hurt you just as badly as anything else. So you know the melt process can cause as much or more damage than the snow itself. So that's always something to keep in mind."

Carney said you want to get rid of ice and snow hanging over the roof so it can't come loose and cause injuries.

"So those are the kinds of things now that we've got the sun coming out and we've got the snow melted, you want to keep a pretty close eye on. Because now that you've made it through the initial storm, now the risk is what else could come after it," he said.

He said the snow would be a problem if snow drifts approach five or six feet on roofs. But he said houses perform well in this type of light snow.

"It would probably have to be you know 50 percent more than what we got. Another 10 or 12 inches before we would really start to see serious problems with this snow," he said.

Carney said the density and amount of snow are the deciding factors.

"You look for a wet snow, you look for a heavy drifting snow, and then of course the quantity. There's going to become a point where there simply is too much."

As far as getting rid of the snow built up, he said let mother nature take care of it.

"The sun in the sky is the best way to deal with it. Honestly. If a roof is already at risk, the last thing you want to do is be on the roof when it goes."