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We end the week with clouds and late day snow squalls

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WATCH FOR SNOW SQUALLS
High pressure calms our winds tonight, and clears the skies for a few hours. Calmer winds and mostly clear skies will lead to a frigid morning in the single digits and low teens.

Hour by Hour 5AM TO 9AM CSV

Clouds quickly return diminishing the sunshine by afternoon. Light southerly breeze will help temperatures climb into the mid and upper 20s.   Snow squalls will accompany an Arctic boundary Friday evening. Snow squalls are quick bursts of snow, which can put down a quick coating of snow and cause visibility to sharply reduce. They are fast moving and there may be several bands of snow swinging through by evening.

ME Futurecast with Isobars

Following the front, is the arrival of the coldest air of the season. Temperatures will struggle to climb through the teens. Winds will be blustery and will be capable of producing wind chills of 10 to 15 degrees below zero. Below are some cold weather safety tips to help you stay safe and warm.

DMA GFS Futurecast Wind Chills
Valentine’s Day
Winds will relax as high pressure builds in overhead. But with morning lows near zero, if not below zero, a wind of just 5-10mph will drop wind chills well below zero. It will only take 30 minutes for frostbite to set on exposed skin. Be sure to bundle up. Below are some cold safety tips to assist you with the quick blast of unseasonably frigid air.

Extreme Cold Safety
MONITORING EARLY WEEK WINTER STORM
A potential winter storm looks likely to impact the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast next Monday into Tuesday. With temperatures still in question, precipitation type remains on the low side. There does appear to be a significant amount of moisture with this system. We will bring you the latest each day heading into the weekend.

Please stay warm and be mindful of your pets. They get cold too!
MaryEllen Pann,
Chief Meteorologist