New West York mayor sworn in after former mayor resigns over racist comments

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WEST YORK, Pa. -- West York Mayor Charles Wasko is out, and a new mayor is in. The change comes after Wasko posted racist comments on his Facebook page.

He then sent a resignation letter to the borough, and they accepted the terms.

Former Borough Council President Shawn Mauck was sworn in Friday.

At the last council meeting, members unanimously nominated Mauck to be mayor until the end of the term.

Mauck said, "I'm excited. I think we finally get to turn the page on a very ugly distraction that our community had both nationally and internationally. We are going to build a better West York and we are going to do it with everyone working together."

Wasko was in hot water after he put out several racist Facebook posts. After backlash from the public, he sent in a letter of resignation to council.

In the letter, he has four conditions. One of them asks the council to "entertain" his request to hire a sergeant for the police department. The other three are personnel issues.

Mauck said, "I hope he can find some peace and resolve this within his heart and move on."

Mauck said he's ready for West York to move on to the next chapter. In his first 100 days as mayor he wants to help the West York police by expanding the neighborhood policing program.

"I'm also going to reach out to residents and do community outreach to let them know there's a new mayor in town and that we're going to continue the good works we've done this year," Mauck said.

Acting Police Chief Matt Millsaps could not attend the swearing-in ceremony but said in a statement:

"We as a police department are excited to move forward in partnernship with Mayor Mauck. It is obvious to us all, that Shawn, like our police force, is focused on serving in a manner that holds the best interests of the community at heart."

Council members will have to appoint a new member to replace Mauck. As mayor, Mauck will only be able to vote on council as a tie-breaker. But he wants everyone to be reassured that he'll still be there for the community.

"The difference is I'll be out in front making suggestions, bringing the community's voice forward and how we get it done. And then they will basically lead by affirming it and passing it into either legislation or policy," he said.

Mauck said he will serve out the term, which ends in December 2017.