Legal Smart: Being prepared

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Social Media and Privacy

When it comes to social media and your privacy, you should know, when you sign up for Facebook and accept the terms and conditions, you're handing over more than just your basic 411.

"Some of the things that Facebook does with your information if you actually read the terms and conditions you'd be horrified," Alison Triessl, a legal expert said.

Information like your birthday, gender and employment history could be available for everyone to see. That information could get into the hands of the wrong people.

A few tips: clean up your friends list and make sure you're actually friends with all the people on your page. Also, don't post when you're going on vacation - or during your vacation. That gives thieves the perfect opportunity to rob your home.

Social Media and Employment

Legal experts say be careful what you're boasting about when you're posting online.

"75% of recruiters are required by their company to do online searches of their candidate for employment," legal expert Alison Triessl said. "70% percent of those recruiters say that they have absolutely disqualified people because of their behavior online."

Even though employers can't discriminate for race or sexual orientation, Triessl says they can use things you post that they think would be a poor reflection of the company.

Food Poisoning

Studies show that nearly 1 in 6 people will get food poisoning each year and more than 200,000 are hospitalized and over 3,000 die.

But how do you know when food poisoning can warrant a lawsuit that you'd likely win?

"Generally speaking.. you have to prove two things in order to have a successful lawsuit.. the food you ate was contaminated and that contamination made you sick," legal expert Alison Triessl said.

She said the case is made stronger if a large group of people get sick from the same types of foods you ate.

But before thinking of a lawsuit, remember to be legal smart, and make sure the fever justifies the finances it takes to go to court.

Kids Flying Alone

If you need to send your pint-sized traveler around the globe -- legal experts have some tips. They say children under five can't fly alone. But junior jet-setters from five to seven can with some guidelines.

"It must be a direct flight and it cannot be the last flight of the night in case they don't get out and no red eyes," legal expert Alison Triessl said.

Triessl says getting your children care in the air -- typically comes with a cost.  Most airlines charge between $50 and $150 each way for children to fly alone.

Online Scams

Pop up ads are all over the world wide web.

"We have sent internet scammers over $13 billion and our gullibility doesn't seem to be going away," legal expert Alsion Triessl said.

Clicking your way to cons has never been easier and fraudsters are cashing in.

"Every time there's a disaster; a hurricane, an earthquake, a tsunami.. we all want to reach into our pockets and help. But unfortunately scammers and predators take advantage of our altruism and they set up fake charitable sites," Triessl said.

They say if you believe you're a victim, freeze your bank accounts, change your passwords and let your card companies know immediately.  Also send emails to family and friends letting them know in case they receive something fraudulent too.

"Go online to the Internet Criminal Complaint Center.. to the IC3 and file a complaint. Believe it or not, despite how much volume there is, you will receive a response and it is the best way to address these issues," Triessl said.