Poll: Should terminally ill people have the right to try non FDA-approved drugs to combat their illnesses?

HARRISBURG, DAUPHIN COUNTY, Pa.– Recently, a bill called the “Right To Try” bill was unanimously passed in the state House of Representatives.

The bill, sponsored by Rep. Robert Godshall, R-Montgomery County, aims to give terminally ill patients the right to try non FDA-approved drugs to combat their illnesses.

Godshall is a bone marrow cancer survivor himself, and he bypassed the FDA to have a transplant surgery that saved his life.

Now, the bill is waiting to be heard by the Senate.

Godshall’s bill would provide immunity for a health care provider from being held liable for unprofessional conduct by performing the experimental treatment. It also protects their license to practice medicine.

Currently, 33 other states allow terminally ill patients access to drugs and treatments that are not yet approved by the FDA, which Godshall has said can take as long as 15 years until the agency deems them to be safe and effective.

However, by trying an experimental drug or treatment, the patient is putting themselves at risk with no one to legally hold accountable.

Our question is, should terminally ill people have the right to try non FDA-approved drugs to combat their illnesses?