Devastated loved ones say York Hospital didn’t allow them to say goodbye to shooting victim

YORK, Pa. -- Tonight, questions over how York Hospital handled the death of an 18-year old Tuesday evening.

Family members say the hospital wouldn't allow close relatives inside and didn't communicate his condition.

Now, the victim’s family is demanding answers...

Around 5 p.m. Tuesday night, 18-year-old Nylik Roger Moore was shot.

Around 5:38 p.m., his mother says he was pronounced dead at York Hospital, but she never got to see him.

The hospital was locked down as a result of gun violence in York that day.

Video taken by a family member shows the outrage and devastation of family members who instead gathered outside the hospital.

Video taken by a shooting victim’s sister shows York City Police attempting to control an emotional crowd, family and friends of 18-year-old Nylik Roger Moore.

Anger growing as authorities usher Moore’s loved ones away from York Hospital, not allowing them inside to say their final goodbyes.

“They had us sitting out there for a whole two hours. We didn’t see my brother," said Markai Rankins, Nylik's little brother.

“The whole situation was unfair, treated unfair, and they didn’t have remorse for anything," said Cheirha Rankins, Nylik's mother.

Police responded to the 100 block of East Maple Street in York where Moore had been shot around 5 Tuesday evening.
His mother says he was pronounced dead at 5:38 p.m.

The family says it was another two hours until they learned Moore had passed away.

“We’re dealing with is this the way WellSpan, York Hospital treat their people?” said Anthony Rankins, Nylik's Uncle.

Questioning what happened between 5 and 5:38 p.m and why Moore’s mother couldn’t see her son during that time.

“Was he on life support, ya’ll pulled the plug? But my family wasn’t there to know step by step!" said Anthony. “Let the mother be there, we didn’t care if nobody else got in!"

It’s something the York County Coroner says is quite uncommon for homicides.

“We have never been told there was a policy where a family can’t view the victim of a homicide. We’ve never been told that before," said Pam Gay, the York County Coroner.

Adding, they use teams specially trained to control emotional crowds.

“One thing I will say is there’s a whole department called ‘crisis intervention’ that we use on our scenes sometimes at traffic accidents or even shootings sometimes," she said.

Mayor Michael Helfrich said he had dinner with Nylik's family, adding the city plans to investigate what happened.

An official with York Hospital sent FOX43 this statement regarding the incident in part: "We have talked to the family to offer our condolences and to sincerely apologize for what occurred Tuesday night. Unfortunately, we did not have a well-established process in place to ensure family access to their loved one during such a complex situation. We have begun working to develop a process for these situations, and we have already had discussions with the Coroner, the Mayor`s Office and the York City Police Department."