Police body cams protecting cops and civilians

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Several high-profile cases are spawning accusations of police brutality around the country. But in Lebanon County, one police department is using technology to prove its officers' actions are appropriate.

North Cornwall Township Police officer, Brad Brandt, mounts his body camera on his shoulder before he starts his shift.

Brandt says, "We have to let them know they're being audio and video recorded."

The department's had the cameras for two years. They were the second department in Pennsylvania to invest in the $5,000 additions. Police say the cameras are worth it, in the wake of controversial cases around the country where the officers are accused of going too far.

Brandt says, "A few incidents of police misbehavior is few and far between, there's a lot of cops that do their job with integrity everyday, the cameras just add extra security for the officer."

Lebanon County District Attorney, David Arnold, agrees. And he suggests the cameras provide security for anyone who's recorded.

Arnold says, "When you know you're on video, you act differently, it's human nature."

Officers say the video camera works like another set of eyes. It begins recording 30 seconds prior to when you activate the camera and footage can be downloaded and used as evidence.

Arnold says, "We have the ability to see the person's actions. If they fail a sobriety test, the jury can see them fail the test then be told about it."

Officer Brandt encourages other cops to consider the cameras.

He says, "It also promotes trust between police and public because they know there's a recording going on during the incident."