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Golf amateurs take a swing on U.S Women’s Open course

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Organizers of the U.S. Women's Open attribute its success to the 2600 helpers. Plus, a U.S. Open Record- more than 130,000 spectators. But the excitement wasn't completely over today, as a few amateurs took a swing at the exact pin placement from Sunday.

Bob Brandt spent the past week putting his love for golf to use in another way. He said, "Entertain guests and clients all week long."

Brandt works for Benchmark. The company was a primary sponsor of the U.S. Women's Open. A day after the tourney, Brandt joins other sponsors who are reaping the benefits of the pros.

Brandt says, "And it's a great place. It's the best park in the world to walk through."

Plus, the course is getting world wide attention. Brandt says, "I've been under the impression this golf course was always in the top 50 in the country, to hear in the media and national news got on sight and looked at it and ranked it a top five is very special."

Playing the course a day after the championship may feel different because of the tournament conditions on the course, but for one professional football player, it's an experience that could help his future.

Brandon McManus is a kicker for the Denver Broncos. He says it's an "opportunity to maybe run a large event like this, my goal is to run the Superbowl, just seeing what it takes to put a full-fledged event like this on."

McManus spent the summer interning with the USGA, prepping for the U.S. Women's Open. Now that the tournament's over, he admits where his heart truly lies: "I would say football, but I love golf, it's a great hobby, humbling sport."

Jerry Hostetter's the General Chairman of the Lancaster Country Club. He says overall, the event's success could be enough for the USGA to return someday.

Hostetter says, "If you said what would be the chances of something going wrong, I could have listed 10 things. None of them went wrong."