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Poll: Does extensive media coverage of terror attacks inspire similar attacks?

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The White House, last month, issued a list of 78 terror attacks to support President Donald Trump’s claim that the media is failing to adequately report them.

Attacks listed, CNN reported, spanned from September 2014 to December 2016. And, on that list: the San Bernardino attack, the Paris attacks, the Orlando nightclub shooting, the truck attacks in Nice and Berlin, the Brussels airport attack, the Istanbul airport and Sultanahmet attacks, and the Sydney siege.

The same day the list was released, Trump told enlisted service-members at MacDill Air Force Base in Florida that attacks were happening “all over Europe” and that “it’s gotten to a point where it’s not even being reported.”

Press Secretary Sean Spicer later elaborated, saying the President “felt as though members of the media don’t always cover some of those events to the extent that other events might get covered; that a protest will get blown out of the water, and yet an attack or a foiled attack doesn’t necessarily get the same coverage.”

The list handed out by the White House mentioned attacks that appeared to have been carried out with Islamist motives, CNN reported. It did not mention the attack on a mosque in Quebec City, or the racially motivated attack by Dylann Roof on a church in South Carolina, in which nine black worshipers were shot dead.

Media has extensively been covering Wednesday’s London terror attack, where one American was killed. A total of four people were killed, and 40 people were injured. Reports of victims’ injuries are developing.

Does extensive media coverage of terror attacks inspire similar attacks?