Poll: Should ballots be changed after finalization in extenuating circumstances?

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CUMBERLAND COUNTY, Pa.– The Carlisle and New Cumberland borough mayoral races will be unusual to say the least.

Currently, one of the choices for mayor of Carlisle is incarcerated, while one of New Cumberland’s options passed away on October 28.

Scott Robinson, the Republican candidate for mayor in Carlisle, is currently in the county jail in connection to a May incident that led to multiple criminal charges.

Natalie Gehosky, the Democratic candidate for mayor in New Cumberland, passed away on October 28, according to her obituary.

However, both candidates will appear on their borough’s ballots, as the ballots had already been finalized before Gehosky’s death. Currently, there is no statute that bars an incarcerated person from appearing on a ballot.

The options have already been laid out if either of the aforementioned candidates are elected.

First, if Gehosky were elected, the Pennsylvania borough code mandates that the borough council appoint an interim mayor within 30 days of the seat being vacant.

If Robinson were elected, there are a few routes that could be taken in finding a replacement.

Robinson must fulfill certain duties after being elected mayor. If he were unable to complete those tasks, the borough council may vote to declare the seat open and appoint a successor.

Ultimately, in both scenarios, if either of the above parties were elected, borough councils would have the control in who is elected mayor.

FOX43’s Mark Roper will have more on the story on FOX43 News First at 4 & 5.

Our question is, should ballots be changed after finalization in extenuating circumstances?