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It’s back! The Pennsylvania Game Commission’s Eagle Cam is back online

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The nest is empty in this screengrab, and there won't be eggs for a few weeks, but the Hanover Eagle Cam is back online for your bird-watching pleasure.

HANOVER — Rejoice, bird watchers! The Eagle Cam is back online.

The Pennsylvania Game Commission announced Wednesday that its popular online attraction is up and running for 2018, offering viewers 24/7 access to video and audio captured at a bald eagle nest near Hanover.

Provided through a partnership with the Game Commission, HDOnTap, Comcast Business and Codorus State Park, the Eagle Cam site features two cameras, each equipped with a microphone, placed 75 feet in a tree adjacent to Codorus State Park.

WATCH: Pennsylvania Game Commission Eagle Cam

Eagles have nested in the tree for more than a decade, and have successfully fledged young eagles there many times, the Pennsylvania Game Commission says.

 

There was some question whether the camera would return to the tree in 2018, the Game Commission says. The nest partially collapsed prior to the 2017 nesting season, but the eagles rebuilt it. The next collapsed further since the last time the Eagle Cam was online, but once again, the adult eagles did some renovating and have it ready to go.

 

As many as 1.5 million viewers have watched the Eagle Cam during a single nesting season.

“While it’s always a thrill to see a bald eagle in the wild, the Game Commission’s Eagle Cam allows viewers to see bald eagles in ways they never could through binoculars or a spotting scope,” said Game Commission executive director Bryan J. Burhans. “As we’ve seen in recent years, there’s no predicting what will happen next on the Eagle Cam. But while those eagles are in and around the nest, you can pretty much guarantee you’ll see something fascinating.”

 

 

Twitter and Facebook users can share the Eagle Cam with friends by using #PGCEagleCam.

Even though there’s weeks to go before any egg-laying or incubating might occur, Burhans said the Eagle Cam always is worth looking in on.

“There’s no better way to observe eagle behavior and nature as it really is,” Burhans said.