Wolf Administration announces new funding for clean up of former Allison Hill automotive site

Governor Tom Wolf

DAUPHIN COUNTY, Pa.– Today, Governor Tom Wolf announced the approval of new funding through the Industrial Sites Reuse Program (ISRP) that will provide for the cleanup of 2.3 acres of the former Allison Hill Automotive site in Harrisburg, Dauphin County to provide for further development on the property for a Hamilton Health Center building addition.
“This new funding is great news for the city of Harrisburg because it will transform a vacant part of the property into a new expansion for Hamilton Health Center, which means even better health and social services for Harrisburg residents,” Governor Wolf said. “Investments like these provide a significant boost to the area.”
The grant will provide $911,113 to remove and dispose of soil at the site so Hamilton Health Center can construct an adjacent two-story addition to its health center. The new addition will consist of a preschool, a child day care, second-floor medical office space, and expanded parking. Hamilton Health originally moved into its Allison Hill facility in 2012 after extensive remediation and demolition work on the property that was necessary due to the numerous environmental hazards left behind by the industrial and manufacturing activities located at the site since the late 1800s. This additional funding will enable further remediation work on the property that will allow Hamilton Health Center to construct its expansion.
“Environmental remediation of contaminated sites is crucial for neighborhood renewal and stimulating private investment in our communities,” said Bryan Davis, executive director for the Harrisburg Redevelopment Authority.  “We deeply appreciate Governor Wolf’s announcement of this award, and our long history of partnerships with the Pennsylvania Departments of Community and Economic Development and Department of Environmental Protection.”
“This project is great step in further developing the Allison Hill neighborhood,” said Dennis Davin, secretary of the Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED) which administers the ISRP program. “When we take steps to turn vacant lots into useful properties like medical centers, we’re strengthening the community and promoting further investment.”
The ISRP provides loans and grants for environmental assessments and remediation carried out by eligible applicants who did not cause or contribute to the contamination. The program is designed to foster the cleanup of environmental contamination at industrial sites, thereby bringing blighted land into productive reuse.
“Bringing vacant properties back into use, especially for an important community need like a health center, is an excellent example of the confluence of environmental protection and economic development,” said Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Secretary Patrick McDonnell. “Healthy environments and healthy communities go hand in hand, and I am glad the DEP was able to be a part of this project.”
SOURCE: Governor’s Office