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Shank’s Tavern prepares for another possible flood

The flooding in Central Pennsylvania is expected to get worse before it gets better.

And Bob shank is dreading the days to come.

“I’m thinking, ‘Oh no! Oh no! Not again!’” said Shank.

His restaurant Shank's Tavern in Marietta is no stranger to severe flooding.

“My grandfather, like I said, bought it in 1930, and his first flood was in 1936.”

That time, the water reached up past the first floor windows.

“As you can see, out on front street, my grandmother lived upstairs. And she came down, they pulled the rowboat in here, she got in the rowboat, and they took her up Waterford Avenue,” said Shank.

And that flood was nothing compared to the flood in 1972.

“I said, 'You know that water is never going to get over the bar,' so we put everything on the bar. Well that was a big mistake. The water was six inches from the second floor.”

Shank says since he has taken over the family business, he has experienced at least five big floods, and given these conditions, he’s preparing for a potential flood number six.

“We’re lining up moving companies and we’re going to start taking stuff upstairs and storing stuff and keeping only the necessities down here,” said Shank.

While the flooding is an inconvenience, he says it won’t stop this century-old family business from operating.

“I love it. It’s in my blood. I was born upstairs 70 years ago. I was literally born upstairs. I was born into the tavern!”

And at the end of the day, this flood will be just another plaque on the wall.

“There’s nothing you can do about it. You just be positive and do what you have to do,” said Shank.