Here’s how you can help those affected by the California wildfires

Rain-free day allows homeowners to empty water out of basements

NORTH CORNWALL TOWNSHIP, LEBANON COUNTY, Pa. --- No more flooding appears to be inside Karen Kohr's home.

But it's taken a lot of work to get it like this.

"We fought...At one point, my husband looked at me and said "I just can't do it anymore." I said, honey, you've got to it and he did," said Kohr.

Starting Monday night, Kohr said she and her husband spent the following 48-72 hours working non-stop to empty water from their basement.

The included making a make-shift roof to stop the flow of water and multiple pipes trying to drain water to the outside.

"Water was coming up through the cracks in our basement so I shop-vac'd for five hours straight and luckily we have a walk-in shower that I could take a bucket and dump and shop-vac and dump and shop-vac and dump," said Kohr.

Kevin Jones, plumbing field supervisor with Lancaster Heating and Plumbing, said their service is picking up after the rain this week.

"We have panicked customers and obviously flooded basements. It's an act of god so there's not much you can really do- just try and help everyone out as much as you can," said Jones.

He added they're seeing two common problems: sub-pipe failures in homes or simply inordinate amounts of water, like in the Kohr's home.

"You've just got a large amount of water coming in where she's got two pumps running, 24 hours a day and over a hundred gallons a minute going into a sump-crock," said Jones.

However, Karen said their valuable are saved, including their mission to "save the kitchen."

"I think we're a lot better off than a lot of other people so I feel really bad for them," said Kohr.

Jones recommends calling a professional if you're not comfortable recognizing or handling any problems on your own.

That includes restoration experts to check to make sure the foundation of the home is safe, as well as if there are any contaminants, such as mold.