The plant-based food craze isn’t slowing down Berkshire-owned Dairy Queen

Beyond Meat just had a scorching debut on Wall Street and Impossible Foods is having trouble keeping up with demand for its plant-based burgers. But Berkshire-owned Dairy Queen, or DQ for short, isn't shy about serving up guilty pleasures like burgers and ice cream.

Beyond Meat just had a scorching debut on Wall Street and Impossible Foods is having trouble keeping up with the demand for its plant-based burgers. But Berkshire-owned Dairy Queen, or DQ for short, isn’t shy about serving up guilty pleasures like burgers and ice cream.

“We looked at plant-based proteins a few years ago but the timing wasn’t right,” said DQ CEO Troy Bader. “There may be a time for it but with some trends, you don’t want to lead.”

Still, Bader acknowledged that consumers are trying to eat in a more healthy manner. And while you shouldn’t expect DQ to start selling vegan burgers any time soon, the company has been mixing up its menu a bit to cater to people who may be counting calories.

Bader said the company’s low fat and low sugar orange vanilla bar has quickly become a favorite — even of Buffett, a chocolate aficionado who loves his Dilly bars. Other less indulgent options on the menu? Mini Blizzards and grilled chicken sandwiches.

DQ is even getting ready to experiment with something that may sound blasphemous — ice cream that isn’t dairy based. Bader said the company is testing treats made from soy, almond and coconut milk.

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.