Libre’s Law still not passed by state legislature

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HARRISBURG, Pa.-- Libre's Law continues to fight on just like the dog it is named after. Libre was at the Capitol on Thursday as the bill named after him went before the House.

Senator Richard Alloway, (R) 33rd District, took us to see Libre and we could see he is in much better shape than a few months ago.

"The amazing thing is if you see the before and after pictures with him," Sen. Alloway said. "It's amazing how loving and how open he is to human interaction."

The senator introduced Libre's Law to make animal cruelty a felony in Pennsylvania. The law became packaged into House Bill 869 with other animal cruelty laws.

"I took Libre's Law, my tethering law, and Cordelia's Law, that deals with horses, and we put it all together into one house bill," Sen. Alloway said.

The law was amended in committee Thursday morning and then passed to the House floor. It was not voted on because, according to House rules, bills must sit 24 hours after they are amended.

Sen. Alloway said," The challenge is they need a two-thirds vote to suspend the rules."

Needless to say, the required votes were not there. Sen. Alloway said they are working to address legislators' concerns.

"This is how it is in Harrisburg. We work hard to push things through," he said. "I thank my friends in the house. It has a lot of support over there."

The senator said it needs to pass sooner as opposed to later.

"Everyday that we wait is another day penalties aren't in place," Sen. Alloway said. "It's important to protect these animals."

According to Sen. Alloway, the House can vote on the bill when they come back on November 14th. If it passes, the Senate can vote on the bill when they return on November 16th, and then the bill would move to the governor's desk.